LMMA Fiji

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The Fiji Locally Managed Marine Area (FLMMA) network is a non-profit and charitable association of resource conservation NGOs, government departments, academic institutions and over 400 communities working together to promote and encourage the preservation, protection and sustainable use of marine resources in Fiji by the stewards of these marine resources.

FLMMA Network efforts have resulted in 135 of Fiji’s marine iQoliqolis (customary fishing areas) being managed and having about 465 fishing reserves or tabu areas covering just over 1000 km2.

FLMMA was established in 2001 and registered under the Charitable Trust Act since 2004, and provides information and resources on LMMAs and community-based adaptive management and training in project design, monitoring, data management and analysis, fundraising, communications and more.

FLMMA approaches can result in improved human well-being through increased capacity to manage or adapt to short and long term threats, thus supporting objectives for community resilience under the National Climate Change Policy, and protect ecosystems and vulnerable species from ridge to reef, assisting Fiji to meet its commitments under the Convention on Biological Diversity.

 


Fiji: Resort Works With Village to Conserve Coral Reefs

Along the Coral Coast of Fiji’s big island of Viti Levu, approximately 130 kilometers (80 miles) west of the capital of Suva, a unique partnership exists between an international beach resort and the small fishing village adjacent to it.

Fiji: Villagers work to overcome the challenges of dynamite fishing

The Tavua LMMA – the second oldest LMMA site in Fiji – was established in 2003 as the result of a Management Planning workshop hosted by the Fiji LMMA Network (FLMMA) in conjunction with the

Fiji: Turtle Calling in Namuana Village

Every year we usually receive tourists in our village. We are known around the world for ‘turtle calling,’ and for this we created our marine reserve for the people coming to see it. We want to boost this project as ecotourism.